Natural Hawai'i

Maui

Maui

MauiVideo has much to offer the visitor, including beautiful landscapes, white-sand beaches, world-class water sports, and prime whale watching country.

Other highlights on Maui include the tourist destinations of Lahaina, the Kaanapali and Kihei strip, while the small towns of Haiku, Kula, Makawao and Hana offer a totally different experience. Other treasures are the Haleakala volcano site and the famous Hana Highway.

Many artists and craftspeople have long been drawn to Maui. Its nickname is ‘The Valley Island’, the official color is pink, its flower is the low-i which is a type of rose, and the unofficial slogan is Maui no ka oi -"Maui is the best".

Maui is the second largest Hawaiian Island with a total land area of 728 sq. miles.

Maui’s west coast is largely dry and sunny while the southeast coast and the Kula uplands receive more rain and commonly have intermittent clouds. Temperatures vary more with elevation than season. The variance between winter and summer is only about 7°F in most places. The average August temperatures (over a 24-hour period) are 77°F in Hana, 78°F in Lahaina and Kihei, 79°F in Kahului and 50°F at Haleakala summit. The lowest temperature ever recorded was at the summit of Haleakala(14°F) and temperatures hovering around freezing are the norm at the summit on winter nights. The mountain even gets an occasional winter snowcap.

HaleakalaAverage annual rainfall is 69 inches in Hana, 13 in Kihei, 15 in Lahaina, 19 in Kahului, and 44 at Haleakala's summit. Puu Kukui, the highest peak of the West Maui Mountains, gets 400 inches of rain a year, just five miles from the dry Wailuku plains.

For recorded weather forecasts call (808) 877-5111. For a more recreational forecast, including conditions at Haleakala and on the road to Hana, sunrise and sunset times, tides and a marine forecast, call (808) 871-5054. Haleakala National Park at (808) 572-7749 has a recorded forecast. For surf and boating conditions call (808) 877-3477

Haleakala Volcano

Haleakala VolcanoHaleakalā  or the East Maui Volcano, is a massive shield volcano that forms more than 75% of the Hawaiian Island of Maui.

Surrounding and including the crater is Haleakalā National Park, a 30,183 acre park, of which 24,719 acres  are wilderness Oheo Gulch (and pools), extending to the shoreline in the Kipahulu area. From the summit, there are two main trails leading into Haleakalā: Sliding Sands Trail and Halemauu Trail.

Because of the remarkable clarity, dryness, and stillness of the air, and its location above one-third of the atmosphere, as well as the absence of the lights of major cities, the summit of Haleakala  is one of the most sought-after locations in the world for ground-based telescopes.

HanaHwyAerialRoad To Hana

The road to Hana, also known as the Hana Belt Road, Hana Road or Hana Highway, is a 68-mile (109 km) long stretch of Hawaii State Routes 36 and 360 which connects Kahului with the town of Hāna in east Maui. On the east after Kalepa bridge, Hana Highway continues to Kīpahulu as Route 31 (Piilani Highway), the first section of which is unofficially considered to be part of Hāna Highway. Although Hāna is only about 52 miles (84 km) from Kahului, a typical trip to Hāna takes about three hours, as the road is very winding and narrow and passes over 59 bridges, 46 of which are only one-lane bridges, requiring oncoming traffic to yield and occasionally causing brief traffic jams if two vehicles meet head-on. There are approximately 620 curves along Route 360 from just east of Kahului to Hāna, virtually all of it through lush, tropical rainforest. Many of the concrete and steel bridges date back to 1910 and all but one are still in use. That one bridge, badly damaged by erosion, has been replaced by a parallel structure by a portable steel Bailey bridge erected by the United States Army Corps of Engineers. Signs on the old bridge warn pedestrians to stay off due to imminent collapse.

Haleakala
We did not find any matches for your request.